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Qualitative research: Exploring the multiple perspectives of osteopathy

Published:October 10, 2011DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijosm.2011.06.001

      Abstract

      This paper is offered as an introduction to qualitative research, with the hope that it informs and stimulates osteopaths and researchers who are unfamiliar with this area of research. This paper discusses the potential contribution of qualitative research in exploring the complex and multiple aspects of osteopathy and how the findings of qualitative studies may contribute to the knowledge base of osteopathy. A definition of qualitative research is provided, and a number of different methodologies are discussed. Finally it suggests examples of how the findings of qualitative research could potentially help inform osteopathic practice.

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